Upstate Rubdown w. Twisted Pine

Thu Nov 17 2016 8:00pm to 11:00pm
$7.00
Door Price: 
$10.00

Upstate

Upstate Rubdown - "Bad Enough" - Lamp Light Music Festival 2016

For Upstate, the last few years have been a time of profound exploration and self-discovery. As the band knocked off milestone after milestone on the road, their sound, their lineup, and even their name all underwent dramatic metamorphoses. Challenging and thrilling all at once, those changes have finally culminated in the septet’s dazzling new self-titled album, a collection that showcases both their remarkable growth and their adventurous blend of folk, R&B, jazz, gospel, and rock and roll.

Recorded primarily over six days at the Clubhouse studio in Rhinebeck, NY, ‘Healing’ is the band’s first release with new members Allison Olender and Christian Joao, their first with four contributing songwriters, and their first since shortening their name from Upstate Rubdown. It’s also their first project to be produced by Wood Brothers percussionist Jano Rix, who helped the group embrace their transformation and lean in to their unique lineup (three female vocalists, upright bass, mandolin, sax, and cajón) without sacrificing any of the gorgeous harmonies, eclectic arrangements, and unforgettable performances that have defined the band since their earliest days.

Upstate first emerged from New York’s Hudson Valley in 2015 with their critically acclaimed debut, ‘A Remedy.’ The Poughkeepsie Journal raved that the group “need[s] nothing more than their voices to channel rhythm and stoke your emotions,” while Chronogram hailed their “infectiously sunny organic stew,” and The Alt called them “toe-tapping, contagious, and fun.” The album earned the band festival performances from Mountain Jam to FreshGrass, as well as a slew of national headline dates and support slots with everyone from The Felice Brothers and Phox to Marco Benevento and Cory Henry.

Twisted Pine

Twisted Pine /// Heart of Glass /// Official Music Video

Praised by NPR for their “upbeat, poppy vibe; energetic, driving rhythms” and “virtuosic solos,” TWISTED PINE has quickly become one of the most acclaimed young string bands in the Northeast. Audiences across the US and UK have been drawn to their forthright songwriting, lush harmonies, musical daring, and charismatic appeal.

Steeped in traditional music, these musicians are also fearless, tuneful improvisers and passionate lovers of pop. Fiddler Kathleen Parks’ command of the vocal mic is as charming as it is gutsy. On her instrument, Parks is an insatiable risk-taker, seeking out exciting new musical territories. Mandolinist Dan Bui is a master of melody and drive, celebrated widely for his dexterous, tasteful picking. And bassist Chris Sartori holds down the low end and a lot more, introducing creative, funk-inflected cadences that never overwhelm the beat.

While it’s easy to celebrate each of the band members individually, Twisted Pine is more than a collection of talented musicians – it’s a unit that grooves together. Their intricate arrangements of swelling, syncopated rhythm and precise, instrumental interplay bring the enveloping sound and hooks of indie pop to an acoustic instrumental setting.

You’ll find Twisted Pine on stages large and small, entertaining festivals of thousands and intimate rooms alike. Winners of the 2018 Boston Music Award’s Americana Artist of the Year and selected as one of Improper Bostonian’s 2018 “Top 10 Local Acts on the Rise,” Twisted Pine has played major events from Grey Fox to DelFest to Glasgow’s Celtic Connections and beyond. “They absolutely rule their musical world with humor and relish,” says legendary fiddler Darol Anger.

Twisted Pine released its debut, self-titled album of original music in 2017, followed in 2018 by Dreams, an EP of “wildly innovative covers… full of spark, light, and irresistible force” according to PopMatters. Check out Twisted Pine on tour and see why The Boston Globe calls them “a wider version of stringband, boundary jumpers akin to outfits like Punch Brothers, Nickel Creek, and Crooked Still.”